Analysis

Emily Weinstein

Research Analyst Print Bio

Emily Weinstein is a Research Analyst at Georgetown’s Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET), focused on Chinese innovation and domestic S&T policies and development. Before joining CSET, Emily was an Analyst at Pointe Bello, a strategic intelligence firm, where she conducted research on Chinese domestic and foreign policy. Independently, Emily has contributed to research projects at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, including the China Defence Universities Tracker and the March 2020 “Uyghurs for sale” report. Her writing has appeared in the University of Nottingham’s Asia Dialogue, the Global Taiwan Brief, Jamestown Foundation’s China Brief, and the Project 2049 Institute’s Asia Eye Blog. Emily holds an M.A. in Security Studies from Georgetown University and a B.A. in Asian Studies from the University of Michigan.

In an opinion piece for Lawfare, Emily Weinstein and her coauthor Ainikki Riikonen argue that the U.S. Department of Justices' China Initiative is counterproductive to U.S. innovation and offer recommendations to improve research security.

Emily Weinstein's latest Lawfare article offers a primer on the Biden administration's China sanctions.

“Science and technology diplomats” act as brokers as part of China’s broader strategy to acquire foreign technology. Each year, they file hundreds of official reports on their activities. This issue brief illuminates trends in the 642 reports filed by the S&T directorates of Chinese embassies and consulates from 2015 to 2020, quantifying which types of technologies the Chinese government is most focused on acquiring, and from where.

Elsa Kania, Emily Weinstein and Lorand Laskai discuss how the U.S. should respond to China's Military-Civil Fusion strategy.

The National Defense Authorization Act requires the Department of Defense to disclose Chinese military companies operating in the United States. In her co-authored piece, CSET's Emily Weinstein analyzes section 1260H of the NDAA and future implications of U.S.-China relations.

New analytic tools are used in this data brief to explore the public artificial intelligence (AI) research portfolio of China’s security forces. The methods contextualize Chinese-language scholarly papers that claim a direct working affiliation with components of the Ministry of Public Security, People's Armed Police Force, and People’s Liberation Army. The authors review potential uses of computer vision, robotics, natural language processing and general AI research.

CSET Research Analyst Emily Weinstein testified before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission hearing on "U.S. Investment in China's Capital Markets and Military-Industrial Complex." Weinstein discussed China's military-civil fusion strategy in university investment firms and Chinese talent programs.

In May 2020, the White House announced it would deny visas to Chinese graduate students and researchers who are affiliated with organizations that implement or support China’s military-civil fusion strategy. The authors discuss several ways this policy might be implemented. Based on Chinese and U.S. policy documents and data sources, they estimate that between three and five thousand Chinese students might be prevented from entering U.S. graduate programs each year.

It’s widely understood that Beijing invests significant resources in shoring up its science and technology prowess, but the extent and flows of the Chinese government’s public investments in S&T are not as well known. This project tracks publicly available information about the budgets of more than two-dozen high-level Chinese government entities, including those that support science, technology, and talent recruitment.

CSET Research Analyst Emily Weinstein emphasizes the increased role China's civil entities play in its military and defense strategy.

Research from a CSET report reveals that more than a dozen U.S. tech firms have collaborative programs with China contributing to China's expanding defense efforts.

CSET Research Analyst Emily Weinstein assesses Taiwan's use of technology to monitor COVID-19 amongst its citizens with respect to privacy.

To help U.S. policymakers address long-held concerns about risks and threats associated with letting Chinese university students or graduates study in the United States, CSET experts examine which forms of collaboration, and with which Chinese universities, pose the greatest risk to U.S. research security.

CSET's Chinese Talent Program Tracker helps policymakers understand China's recruitment efforts.

China operates a number of party- and state-sponsored talent programs to recruit researchers -- Chinese citizens and non-citizens alike -- to bolster its strategic civilian and military goals. CSET has created a tracker to catalog publicly available information about these programs. This catalog is a work in progress; if you have further information on programs currently not included in it -- or if you spot an error -- please complete the form at http://bit.ly/ChineseTalent

The current global pandemic has given China a chance to amplify its efforts to apply artificial intelligence across the public and private spheres. Chinese companies are developing and retooling AI systems for control and prevention. This data brief assesses the types of AI technologies used to fight COVID-19 and the key players involved in this industry.

China's government encourages members of the Chinese diaspora to engage in technology transfer through Chinese professional associations. This issue brief analyzes 208 such associations to assess the scope of technical exchange between overseas professionals and entities within China.

This report summarizes Chinese reactions to a May 29th White House proclamation forbidding entry to the United States of graduate students or researchers with past or current affiliations with entities supporting China’s military-civil fusion. It draws on sources ranging from government statements and state-owned media to blog posts.