CSET

For Export Controls on AI, Don’t Forget the “Catch-All” Basics

Emily S. Weinstein

Kevin Wolf

July 5, 2023

Existing U.S. government tools and approaches may help mitigate some of the issues worrying AI observers. This blog post describes long-standing “catch-all” controls, administered by the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), and how they might be used to address some of these threats.

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