Analysis

Jack Corrigan

Research Analyst Print Bio

Jack Corrigan is a Research Analyst at Georgetown’s Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET). Previously, Jack provided research and writing assistance on a book about the growing power of the U.S. private sector and its effect on the country’s social contract. He also worked as a journalist covering federal tech and cybersecurity for Nextgov, an Atlantic Media publication. Jack holds a B.S. in Journalism and a B.A. in Economics from Northwestern University.

Universities are the engines that power the AI talent pipeline, but mounting evidence suggests that U.S. computer science departments do not have enough faculty to meet growing student interest. This paper explores the potential mismatch between supply and demand in AI education, discusses possible causes and consequences, and offers recommendations for increasing teaching capacity at U.S. universities.

This issue brief uses data from the National Science Foundation’s Survey of Doctorate Recipients to explore how many of the international students who earn STEM PhDs from U.S. universities stay in the country after graduation. The authors trace the journeys that these graduates take through the immigration system and find that most remain in the United States long after earning their degrees.

CSET submitted this comment to the Office of Science and Technology Policy on updating the National Artificial Intelligence Research and Development Strategic Plan.

The strength of a country’s talent pipeline depends in no small part on the quality of its universities. This data brief explores how Chinese and U.S. universities perform in two different global university rankings, why their standings have changed over time, and what those trends mean for graduates.

Since the mid-2000s, China has consistently graduated more STEM PhDs than the United States, a key indicator of a country’s future competitiveness in STEM fields. This paper explores the data on STEM PhD graduation rates and projects their growth over the next five years, during which the gap between China and the United States is expected to increase significantly.

As dual-use technologies transform the national security landscape, the U.S. Department of Defense has established a variety of offices and programs dedicated to bringing private sector innovation into the military. However, these efforts have largely failed to drive cutting-edge commercial technology into major military platforms and systems. This report examines the shortcomings of the DOD’s current approach to defense innovation and offers recommendations for a more effective strategy.