Analysis,
Data Science

Sara Abdulla

Data Research Analyst Print Bio

Sara Abdulla is a Data Research Analyst at Georgetown’s Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET). Previously, she worked as a research assistant for the CDC supporting enteric disease health surveillance. Additionally, she has written about the ethical implications of neurotechnology on the criminal justice system and on far-right men’s movements. Sara earned a B.S. in Neuroscience with a minor in Philosophy from Georgia State University in Atlanta.

Data Snapshots are informative descriptions and quick analyses that dig into CSET’s unique data resources. Our first series of Snapshots will introduce CSET’s Map of Science and explore the underlying data and analytic utility of this new tool. Check in every two weeks to see our newest Snapshot, and explore CSET’s Map of Science user interface, which enables users to interact with the Map directly.

Data Snapshots are informative descriptions and quick analyses that dig into CSET’s unique data resources. Our first series of Snapshots will introduce CSET’s Map of Science and explore the underlying data and analytic utility of this new tool. Check in every two weeks to see our newest Snapshot, and explore CSET’s Map of Science user interface, which enables users to interact with the Map directly.

Since 2011, China has dramatically grown its robotics sector as part of its mission to achieve technological leadership. The Chinese government has encouraged this growth through incentives and, in some cases, subsidies. Patents in robotics have surged, particularly at Chinese universities; by contrast, private companies comprise the bulk of robotics patent filers around the world. China has also seen a corresponding growth in robotics purchasing and active robotics stock. This data brief explores the trends in robotics patent families published from China as a measure of robotics advancement and finds that China is on track to emerge as a world leader in robotics.

With its massive information technology workforce, thriving research community and a growing technology ecosystem, India has a significant stake in the development of artificial intelligence globally. Drawing from a variety of original CSET datasets, the authors evaluate India’s potential for AI by examining its progress across five categories of indicators pertinent to AI development: talent, research, patents, companies and investments, and compute.