Data Brief

Building the Cybersecurity Workforce Pipeline

A Study of the National Centers of Academic Excellence in Cybersecurity

Luke Koslosky

Ali Crawford

Sara Abdulla

June 2023

Creating adequate talent pipelines for the cybersecurity workforce is an ongoing priority for the federal government. Understanding the effectiveness of current education initiatives will help policymakers make informed decisions. This report analyzes the National Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyber (NCAE-C), a consortium of institutions designated as centers of excellence by the National Security Agency. It aims to determine how NCAE-C designated institutions fare compared to other schools in graduating students with cyber-related degrees and credentials.

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