Heather Frase, PhD is a Senior Fellow at Georgetown’s Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET), where she works on AI Assessment. She also serves as an unpaid advisor to Meta’s Open Loop project, providing expertise on implementation of the National Institute for Standards and Technology’s AI Risk Management Framework. Prior to joining CSET, Heather spent eight years providing data analytics, computational modeling, Machine Learning (ML), and Artificial Intelligence (AI) support for Intelligence, Defense, and Federal contracts. Additionally, Heather spent 14 years at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA), supporting Director, Operational Test and Evaluation (DOT&E). At IDA she led analytic research teams to apply scientific, technological, and statistical expertise to develop data metrics and collection plans for operational tests of major defense systems, analyze test data, and produce assessments of operational effectiveness and suitability. She has a Ph.D. in Material Science from the California Institute of Technology and a BS in Physics from Miami University in Oxford Ohio.

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