Talent

U.S. AI Workforce

Diana Gehlhaus Ilya Rahkovsky
| April 2021

A lack of good data on the U.S. artificial intelligence workforce limits the potential effectiveness of policies meant to increase and cultivate this cadre of talent. In this issue brief, the authors bridge that information gap with new analysis on the state of the U.S. AI workforce, along with insight into the ongoing concern over AI talent shortages. Their findings suggest some segments of the AI workforce are more likely than others to be experiencing a supply-demand gap.

AI Hubs

Max Langenkamp Melissa Flagg
| April 2021

U.S. policymakers need to understand the landscape of artificial intelligence talent and investment as AI becomes increasingly important to national and economic security. This knowledge is critical as leaders develop new alliances and work to curb China’s growing influence. As an initial effort, an earlier CSET report, “AI Hubs in the United States,” examined the domestic AI ecosystem by mapping where U.S. AI talent is produced, where it is concentrated, and where AI private equity funding goes. Given the global nature of the AI ecosystem and the importance of international talent flows, this paper looks for the centers of AI talent and investment in regions and countries that are key U.S. partners: Europe and the CANZUK countries (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom).

Mapping India’s AI Potential

Husanjot Chahal Sara Abdulla Jonathan Murdick Ilya Rahkovsky
| March 2021

With its massive information technology workforce, thriving research community and a growing technology ecosystem, India has a significant stake in the development of artificial intelligence globally. Drawing from a variety of original CSET datasets, the authors evaluate India’s potential for AI by examining its progress across five categories of indicators pertinent to AI development: talent, research, patents, companies and investments, and compute.

CSET partnered with the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence to discuss the findings and recommendations of the commissions final report, released in early March.

Stealth technology was one of the most decisive developments in military aviation in the last 50 years. With U.S. technological leadership now under challenge, especially from China, this issue brief derives several lessons from the history of Stealth to guide current policymakers. The example of Stealth shows how the United States produced one critical technology in the past and how it might produce others today.

In a review of the recommendations by a key government commission on ways to bolster the U.S. tech industry, this Forbes column points to a study by CSET's Remco Zwetsloot that delves into ways to attract and retain overseas tech talent.

Reconsidering the ‘China Initiative’

Inside Higher Ed
| March 2, 2021

CSET Senior Fellow Anna Puglisi weighs in on the China Initiative and whether the Chinese government is exploiting its talent programs to target U.S. innovation.

CSET research finds that one-fifth of Chinese students will not be allowed to enroll in STEM programs due to U.S. visa restrictions.

Assessing the Scope of U.S. Visa Restrictions on Chinese Students

Remco Zwetsloot Emily Weinstein Ryan Fedasiuk
| February 2021

In May 2020, the White House announced it would deny visas to Chinese graduate students and researchers who are affiliated with organizations that implement or support China’s military-civil fusion strategy. The authors discuss several ways this policy might be implemented. Based on Chinese and U.S. policy documents and data sources, they estimate that between three and five thousand Chinese students might be prevented from entering U.S. graduate programs each year.

CSET report reveals that most workers and researchers in the field of artificial intelligence come from overseas.