Analysis,
CyberAI Project

Kayla Goode

Research Analyst Print Bio

Kayla Goode is a Research Analyst at Georgetown’s Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET), where she works on the CyberAI Project. Previously, she worked as a consultant building data visualizations for the Department of Commerce and Department of Homeland Security. She completed her M.A. in Security Studies from Georgetown University and received her B.A. in Peace and Conflict Studies from Colgate University. 

This policy brief addresses the need for a clearly defined artificial intelligence education and workforce policy by providing recommendations designed to grow, sustain, and diversify the U.S. AI workforce. The authors employ a comprehensive definition of the AI workforce—technical and nontechnical occupations—and provide data-driven policy goals. Their recommendations are designed to leverage opportunities within the U.S. education and training system while mitigating its challenges, and prioritize equity in access and opportunity to AI education and AI careers.

This policy brief, authored in collaboration with the MITRE Corporation, provides a new perspective on the U.S. Department of Defense’s struggle to recruit and retain artificial intelligence talent. The authors find that the DOD already has a cadre of AI and related experts, but that this talent remains hidden. Better leveraging this talent could go a long way in meeting the DOD’s AI objectives. The authors argue that this can be done through policies that more effectively identify AI talent and assignment opportunities, processes that incentivize experimentation and changes in career paths, and investing in the necessary technological infrastructure.

A globally competitive AI workforce hinges on the education, development, and sustainment of the best and brightest AI talent. This issue brief compares efforts to integrate AI education in China and the United States, and what advantages and disadvantages this entails. The authors consider key differences in system design and oversight, as well as strategic planning. They then explore implications for the U.S. national security community.

A globally competitive AI workforce hinges on the education, development, and sustainment of the best and brightest AI talent. This issue brief provides an overview of the education systems in China and the United States, lending context to better understand the accompanying main report, “AI Education in China and the United States: A Comparative Assessment.”

The United States and China are keeping an eye on Indonesia’s artificial intelligence potential given the country’s innovation-driven national strategy and flourishing AI industry. China views Indonesia as an anchor for its economic, digital, and political inroads in Southeast Asia and has invested aggressively in new partnerships. The United States, with robust political and economic relations rooted in shared democratic ideals, has an opportunity to leverage its comparative advantages and tap into Indonesia’s AI potential through high-level agreements.

U.S. AI Summer Camps

August 2021

Summer camps are an integral part of many U.S. students’ education, but little is known about camps that focus on artificial intelligence education. This data brief maps out the AI summer camp landscape in the United States and explores the camps’ locations, target age ranges, price, and hosting organization type.