Investment

U.S. Demand for AI-Related Talent

Autumn Toney Melissa Flagg
| August 2020

The U.S. government and industry both see artificial intelligence as a pivotal technology for future growth and competitiveness. What skills will be needed to create, integrate, and deploy AI applications? This data brief analyzes market demand for AI-related jobs to determine their educational requirements, dominant sectors, and geographic distribution.

Identifying AI-Related Companies

Zachary Arnold Rebecca Gelles Ilya Rahkovsky
| July 2020

Artificial intelligence is of increasing interest to the private sector, but what exactly constitutes an “AI company?” This data brief offers a flexible, data-driven framework for identifying the companies most relevant in this field at the moment, providing policymakers and researchers with a tool for mapping technology transfer risks and gauging the overall health of America’s AI sector.

The China Scholarship Council: An Overview

Ryan Fedasiuk
| July 2020

The Chinese government seeks to exert influence through its scholarship and exchange programs. This issue brief assembles a picture of the China Scholarship Council—the primary vehicle by which the state provides scholarships—through Chinese-language sources.

Washington moves to mimic Beijing on tech subsidies

National Journal
| June 14, 2020

CSET Director of Strategy Helen Toner weighs in on the U.S. government's growing interest in direct investments to support continued technology innovation.

Global R&D and a New Era of Alliances

Melissa Flagg
| June 2020

Research and development funding and technological leadership are crucial to sustaining America’s comparative advantages. While the prevailing narrative suggests that China leads in a bipolar competition, in reality, the United States and its allies comprise a majority of global R&D.

How should democracies effectively compete against authoritarian regimes in the AI space? This report offers a “terrain strategy” for the United States to leverage the malleability of artificial intelligence to offset authoritarians' structural advantages in engineering and deploying AI.

AI Hubs in the United States

Melissa Flagg
| May 2020

With the increasing importance of artificial intelligence and the competition for AI talent, it is essential to understand the U.S. domestic industrial AI landscape. A new CSET data brief maps where AI talent is produced, where it concentrates, and where AI equity funding goes. This mapping reveals distinct AI hubs emerging across the country, with different growth rates, investment levels, and potential access to talent.

While AI innovation would presumably continue in some form without Big Tech, the authors find that breaking up the largest technology companies could fundamentally change the broader AI innovation ecosystem, likely affecting the development of AI applications for national security.

See our translation of China’s plan for science and technology innovation during the years of the 13th Five-Year Plan (2016-2020). The plan puts forward plan details specific technologies identified as near-term priorities for research and investment.

Chinese Public AI R&D Spending: Provisional Findings

Ashwin Acharya Zachary Arnold
| December 2019

China aims to become “the world’s primary AI innovation center” by 2030. Toward that end, the Chinese government is spending heavily on AI research and development (R&D)—but perhaps not as heavily as some have thought. This memo provides a provisional, open-source estimate of China’s spending.