Investment

U.S. AI Workforce

Diana Gehlhaus Ilya Rahkovsky
| April 2021

A lack of good data on the U.S. artificial intelligence workforce limits the potential effectiveness of policies meant to increase and cultivate this cadre of talent. In this issue brief, the authors bridge that information gap with new analysis on the state of the U.S. AI workforce, along with insight into the ongoing concern over AI talent shortages. Their findings suggest some segments of the AI workforce are more likely than others to be experiencing a supply-demand gap.

AI Hubs

Max Langenkamp Melissa Flagg
| April 2021

U.S. policymakers need to understand the landscape of artificial intelligence talent and investment as AI becomes increasingly important to national and economic security. This knowledge is critical as leaders develop new alliances and work to curb China’s growing influence. As an initial effort, an earlier CSET report, “AI Hubs in the United States,” examined the domestic AI ecosystem by mapping where U.S. AI talent is produced, where it is concentrated, and where AI private equity funding goes. Given the global nature of the AI ecosystem and the importance of international talent flows, this paper looks for the centers of AI talent and investment in regions and countries that are key U.S. partners: Europe and the CANZUK countries (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom).

Mapping India’s AI Potential

Husanjot Chahal Sara Abdulla Jonathan Murdick Ilya Rahkovsky
| March 2021

With its massive information technology workforce, thriving research community and a growing technology ecosystem, India has a significant stake in the development of artificial intelligence globally. Drawing from a variety of original CSET datasets, the authors evaluate India’s potential for AI by examining its progress across five categories of indicators pertinent to AI development: talent, research, patents, companies and investments, and compute.

CSET partnered with the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence to discuss the findings and recommendations of the commissions final report, released in early March.

CSET Research Fellow Zachary Arnold testified before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission hearing on "U.S. Investment in China's Capital Markets and Military-Industrial Complex." Arnold discussed discuss China’s use of financial capital flows and the state’s prominent role in allocating capital to specific firms and sectors.

CSET Research Analyst Emily Weinstein testified before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission hearing on "U.S. Investment in China's Capital Markets and Military-Industrial Complex." Weinstein discussed China's military-civil fusion strategy in university investment firms and Chinese talent programs.

CSET experts Zachary Arnold and Emily Weinstein testified before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission to discuss Chinese capital markets and offer recommendations to protect U.S. investment.

“Whatever we can do in our technology strategy to maintain that leverage now will have huge geopolitical and strategic relevance in the years ahead,” warns CSET Fellow Saif M. Khan before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee ahead of the U.S.-China meetings.

Chinese Government Guidance Funds

Ngor Luong Zachary Arnold Ben Murphy
| March 2021

The Chinese government is pouring money into public-private investment funds, known as guidance funds, to advance China’s strategic and emerging technologies, including artificial intelligence. These funds are mobilizing massive amounts of capital from public and private sources—prompting both concern and skepticism among outside observers. This overview presents essential findings from our full-length report on these funds, analyzing the guidance fund model, its intended benefits and weaknesses, and its long-term prospects for success.

Understanding Chinese Government Guidance Funds

Ngor Luong Zachary Arnold Ben Murphy
| March 2021

China’s government is using public-private investment funds, known as guidance funds, to deploy massive amounts of capital in support of strategic and emerging technologies, including artificial intelligence. Drawing exclusively on Chinese-langauge sources, this report explores how guidance funds raise and deploy capital, manage their investment, and interact with public and private actors. The guidance fund model is no silver bullet, but it has many advantages over traditional industrial policy mechanisms.