Investment

The U.S. AI Workforce

Diana Gehlhaus Santiago Mutis
| January 2021

As the United States seeks to maintain a competitive edge in artificial intelligence, the strength of its AI workforce will be of paramount importance. In order to understand the current state of the domestic AI workforce, Diana Gehlhaus and Santiago Mutis define the AI workforce and offer a preliminary assessment of its size, composition, and key characteristics. Among their findings: The domestic supply of AI talent consisted of an estimated 14 million workers (or about 9% of total U.S. employment) as of 2018.

Buying Silence: The Price of Internet Censorship in China

The Jamestown Foundation
| January 12, 2021

CSET Research Analyst Ryan Fedasiuk analyzes China's investment in internet and social media censorship.

In this brief, CSET Research Analyst Ryan Fedasiuk analyzes how China gathers funding to influence overseas Chinese communities.

Mapping U.S. Multinationals’ Global AI R&D Activity

Roxanne Heston Remco Zwetsloot
| December 2020

Many factors influence where U.S. tech multinational corporations decide to conduct their global artificial intelligence research and development (R&D). Company AI labs are spread all over the world, especially in North America, Europe and Asia. But in contrast to AI labs, most company AI staff remain concentrated in the United States. Roxanne Heston and Remco Zwetsloot explain where these companies conduct AI R&D, why they select particular locations, and how they establish their presence there. The report is accompanied by a new open-source dataset of more than 60 AI R&D labs run by these companies worldwide.

A CSET study cited in this article showed that 68 percent of the United States’ top 50 artificial intelligence companies were co-founded by immigrants, most of whom came the U.S. as students. The Biden administration's recommitment to R&D could shape U.S. immigration policy.

During this live event, CSET Research Fellow Zachary Arnold discussed the findings and recommendations of CSET's recently published report "Tracking AI Investment." Zach described the landscape of commercial AI investment and how it informs economic and security policy.

Microsoft Unveils Lobe; Will this Make AI Mainstream?

Psychology Today
| October 26, 2020

Psychology Today published an article on Microsoft's new Lobe application. The article featured original research from several CSET experts, including Research Fellow Zachary Arnold, Data Analyst Ilya Rahkovsky and Research Analyst Tina Huang.

The United States has long used export controls to prevent the proliferation of advanced semiconductors and the inputs necessary to produce them. With Beijing building up its own chipmaking industry, the United States has begun tightening restrictions on exports of semiconductor manufacturing equipment to China. This brief provides an overview of U.S. semiconductor export control policies and analyzes the impacts of those policies on U.S.-China trade.

CSET Senior Fellow Melissa Flagg spoke with National Journal about the White House's National Strategy for Critical and Emerging Technologies. Releasing a high-level document is wise, said Dr. Flagg, but doing so just before an election may lessen its effect.

National security leaders view AI as a priority technology for defending the United States. This two-part analysis is intended to help policymakers better understand the scope and implications of U.S. military investment in autonomy and AI. It focuses on the range of autonomous and AI-enabled technologies the Pentagon is developing, the military capabilities these applications promise to deliver, and the impact that such advances could have on key strategic issues.