Tag Archive: Export controls

CSET Research Fellow Emily Weinstein testified before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission at a hearing on "Challenges from Chinese Policy in 2022: Zero-COVID, Ukraine, and Pacific Diplomacy." Weinstein proposed the creation of a new export control regime.

Drawing from his CSET report "Silicon Twist," Research Analyst Ryan Fedasiuk shares how the U.S. can mitigate the Chinese military's acquisition of U.S.-manufactured AI chips in an interview with FedScoop.

Making War More Difficult to Wage

Foreign Affairs
| July 15, 2022

In an opinion piece for Foreign Affairs, Research Fellow Emily Weinstein detailed how the unprecedented response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has altered the culture around export controls, and how this changed environment presents an opportunity for the United States and its allies to create a new export control regime among like-minded democracies.

The White House supports transparency in American investment in critical sectors in China, but current export controls are not sufficient to prevent out-bound investment issues according to Research Fellow Emily Weinstein.

In a May CSET webinar, Research Fellow Emily Weinstein and Non-Resident Senior Fellow Kevin Wolf outline a new model for an export control regime to address contemporary challenges.

In a May CSET webinar, Emily Weinstein and Kevin Wolf propose an export control regime that could effectively keep sensitive technologies from being missed by authoritarian governments and reduce pressure on the U.S. to impose unilateral controls.

In the May CSET webinar, Emily Weinstein and Kevin Wolf outline how the U.S. and its allies can establish a new multilateral export control regime.

COCOM’s daughter?

World ECR
| May 13, 2022

In an opinion piece for World ECR, CSET's Emily Weinstein and Kevin Wolf explain why a multilateral export control regime is needed to address national security and human rights issues.

Preserving the Chokepoints

Andre Barbe Will Hunt
| May 2022

Offshoring the production of semiconductor manufacturing equipment would remove an important source of leverage over China and make the United States more dependent on other countries for some of the most important inputs to semiconductor manufacturing. This brief explores the factors driving U.S. SME firms to offshore production and what can be done to slow or reverse offshoring.

CSET Research Fellow Emily Weinstein and CSET Non-Resident Senior Fellow Kevin Wolf discussed their proposal for a new export control regime among techno-democracies to better address contemporary challenges.