International standing

The world is watching how the Chinese military develops and deploys artificial intelligence—but how exactly will it apply AI? This policy brief analyzes Chinese experts’ arguments about AI and prospective warfighting capabilities, identifying prevailing concerns about strategic stability and unintended escalation.

CSET and the Bipartisan Policy Center partnered with Representatives Robin Kelly and Will Hurd to propose guidelines for national security considerations that must be addressed in a national AI strategy. The findings identify key areas for improvement in defense and intelligence to put the nation on a path to large-scale development and deployment of AI tools in promoting national security.

Messier than Oil: Assessing Data Advantage in Military AI

Husanjot Chahal Ryan Fedasiuk Carrick Flynn
| July 2020

Both China and the United States seek to develop military applications enabled by artificial intelligence. This issue brief reviews the obstacles to assessing data competitiveness and provides metrics for measuring data advantage.

Overseas Professionals and Technology Transfer to China

Ryan Fedasiuk Emily Weinstein
| July 21, 2020

China's government encourages members of the Chinese diaspora to engage in technology transfer through Chinese professional associations. This issue brief analyzes 208 such associations to assess the scope of technical exchange between overseas professionals and entities within China.

Immigration Policy and the Global Competition for AI Talent

Tina Huang Zachary Arnold
| June 2020

Current immigration policies may undermine the historic strength of the United States in attracting and retaining international AI talent. This report examines the immigration policies of four U.S. economic competitor nations—the United Kingdom, Canada, France, and Australia—to offer best practices for ensuring future AI competitiveness.

Global R&D and a New Era of Alliances

Melissa Flagg
| June 2020

Research and development funding and technological leadership are crucial to sustaining America’s comparative advantages. While the prevailing narrative suggests that China leads in a bipolar competition, in reality, the United States and its allies comprise a majority of global R&D.

How should democracies effectively compete against authoritarian regimes in the AI space? This report offers a “terrain strategy” for the United States to leverage the malleability of artificial intelligence to offset authoritarians' structural advantages in engineering and deploying AI.

Significant debate surrounds the gap between China’s technological ambitions and achievements, and the long-term prospects for its development of key technologies. On May 8, Brookings hosted a virtual event to explore these and other questions in tandem with CSET experts.

The United States must collaborate with its allies and partners to shape the trajectory of artificial intelligence, promoting liberal democratic values and protecting against efforts to wield AI for authoritarian ends, CSET researchers said in a report released today.

Agile Alliances

Andrew Imbrie Ryan Fedasiuk Catherine Aiken Tarun Chhabra Husanjot Chahal
| February 2020

The United States must collaborate with its allies and partners to shape the trajectory of artificial intelligence, promoting liberal democratic values and protecting against efforts to wield AI for authoritarian ends.