International standing

The Huawei Moment

Alex Rubin Alan Omar Loera Martinez Jake Dow Anna Puglisi
| July 2021

For the first time, a Chinese company—Huawei—is set to lead the global transition from one key national security infrastructure technology to the next. How did Washington, at the beginning of the twenty-first century, fail to protect U.S. firms in this strategic technology and allow a geopolitical competitor to take a leadership position in a national security relevant critical infrastructure such as telecommunications? This policy brief highlights the characteristics of 5G development that China leveraged, exploited, and supported to take the lead in this key technology. The Huawei case study is in some ways the canary in the coal mine for emerging technologies and an illustration of what can happen to U.S. competitiveness when China’s companies do not have to base decisions on market forces.

National Power After AI

Matthew Daniels Ben Chang
| July 2021

AI technologies will likely alter great power competitions in foundational ways, changing both how nations create power and their motives for wielding it against one another. This paper is a first step toward thinking more expansively about AI & national power and seeking pragmatic insights for long-term U.S. competition with authoritarian governments.

CSET Research Analyst Will Hunt calls for the U.S. government to invest in domestic fabrication for chip manufacturing as a result of the current ship shortage.

A new world order for science

Axios
| June 24, 2021

A CSET report by Melissa Flagg, Autumn Toney and Paul Harris reveals a more collaborative and less competitive future in global research.

Is the world splitting into opposing science ‘blocs’?

University World News
| June 23, 2021

CSET's Emily Weinstein spoke with University World News on China's strategy to become the global leaders on science and technology research.

Do Colleges Need a Foreign Policy?

The Chronicle of Higher Education
| June 22, 2021

As colleges maneuver around ongoing international relations, a CSET report argues that research is becoming more globalized.

CSET Research Analyst Husanjot Chahal sheds light on India's growing AI capabilities and how it can help grow the U.S.' AI initiatives in the India-U.S. relationship.

U.S. Demand for AI Certifications

Diana Gehlhaus Ines Pancorbo
| June 2021

This issue brief explores whether artificial intelligence and AI-related certifications serve as potential pathways to enter the U.S. AI workforce. The authors find that according to U.S. AI occupation job postings data over 2010–2020, there is little demand from employers for AI and AI-related certifications. From this perspective, such certifications appear to present more hype than promise.

Global: A New Look at the International Distribution of Research

The Chronicle of Higher Education
| June 7, 2021

Melissa Flagg, Autumn Toney and Paul Harris' latest research shows a shift in global research collaboration.

Using CSET’s new Map of Science to examine clusters of research publications, this data brief presents a comparative analysis of U.S. and Chinese research publication outputs. The authors find that global competition outcomes differ depending on the level of granularity when comparing research publication data. In a granular view of global scientific research, the United States and China together dominate almost two-thirds of the research publication output, with the rest of the world leading in more than one-third of publication output. In a general view of global scientific research, only China and the United States appear as leaders in research output.