Bio-Risk

In an article by the Associated Press that discusses the increasing concern among U.S. lawmakers regarding the nation's competitive stance against China in the biotechnology sector, CSET's Anna Puglisi provided her expert insights.

China’s Hybrid Economy: What to Do about BGI?

Anna Puglisi
| February 2, 2024

As the U.S. government considers banning genomics companies from China in the Biosecure Act, it opens a broader question of how the U.S. and other market economies should deal with China’s national champions. This blog post provides an overview of BGI and how China’s industrial policy impacts technology development.

CSET’s Must Read Research: A Primer

Tessa Baker
| December 18, 2023

This guide provides a run-down of CSET’s research since 2019 for first-time visitors and long-term fans alike. Quickly get up to speed on our “must-read” research and learn about how we organize our work.

AI and Biorisk: An Explainer

Steph Batalis
| December 2023

Recent government directives, international conferences, and media headlines reflect growing concern that artificial intelligence could exacerbate biological threats. When it comes to biorisk, AI tools are cited as enablers that lower information barriers, enhance novel biothreat design, or otherwise increase a malicious actor’s capabilities. In this explainer, CSET Biorisk Research Fellow Steph Batalis summarizes the state of the biorisk landscape with and without AI.

Breaking Down the Biden AI EO: Screening DNA Synthesis and Biorisk

Steph Batalis Vikram Venkatram
| November 16, 2023

The recent Executive Order on the Safe, Secure, and Trustworthy Development and Use of Artificial Intelligence will have major implications for biotechnology. The EO demonstrates that the White House considers biorisk a major concern for AI safety and security. In this blog post CSET’s bio experts explain the bio-relevant takeaways of the executive order, add some additional context, and note their remaining questions about its implementation.

There’s a lot to digest in the October 30 White House’s AI Executive Order. Our tracker is a useful starting point to identify key provisions and monitor the government’s progress against specific milestones, but grappling with the substance is an entirely different matter. This blog post, focusing on Section 4 of the EO (“Developing Guidelines, Standards, and Best Practices for AI Safety and Security”), is the first in a series that summarizes interesting provisions, shares some of our initial reactions, and highlights some of CSET’s research that may help the USG tackle the EO.

The Antimicrobial Resistance Research Landscape and Emerging Solutions

Vikram Venkatram Katherine Quinn
| November 2023

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the world’s most pressing global health threats. Basic research is the first step towards identifying solutions. This brief examines the AMR research landscape since 2000, finding that the amount of research is increasing and that the U.S. is a leading publisher, but also that novel solutions like phages and synthetic antimicrobial production are a small portion of that research.

Can Chatbots Help You Build a Bioweapon?

Foreign Policy
| November 5, 2023

In an op-ed published in Foreign Policy, CSET’s Steph Batalis discusses the potential misuse of artificial intelligence chatbots in providing instructions for the construction of biological weapons.

Comment on OSTP RFI 88 FR 60513

Steph Batalis
| October 16, 2023

CSET submitted the following comment in response to a Request for Information (RFI) from the White House's Office of Science and Technology Policy about potential changes to the Policies for Federal and Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of Concern (DURC) and Recommended Policy Guidance for Departmental Development of Review Mechanisms for Potential Pandemic Pathogen Care and Oversight (P3CO).

Gain-of-Function Risk Is Not One-Size-Fits-All

Think Global Health
| September 29, 2023

In their op-ed featured in Think Global Health, CSET's Steph Batalis and Caroline Schuerger provide expert analysis on the ongoing debate in the United States regarding gain-of-function (GOF) research.