Publications

CSET produces evidence-driven analysis in a variety of forms, from informative graphics and translations to expert testimony and published reports. Our key areas of inquiry are the foundations of artificial intelligence — such as talent, data and computational power — as well as how AI can be used in cybersecurity and other national security settings. We also do research on the policy tools that can be used to shape AI’s development and use, and on biotechnology.

Analysis

Assessing China’s AI Workforce

Dahlia Peterson Ngor Luong Jacob Feldgoise
| November 2023

Demand for talent is one of the core elements of technological competition between the United States and China. In this issue brief, we explore demand signals in China’s domestic AI workforce in two ways: geographically and within the defense and surveillance sectors. Our exploration of job postings from Spring 2021 finds that more than three-quarters of all AI job postings are concentrated in just three regions: the Yangtze River Delta region, the Pearl River Delta, and the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei area.

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Analysis

The PRC’s Efforts Abroad

Owen Daniels
| September 2023

This report summarizes more than 20 CSET reports, translations, and data analyses to provide insight into the steps China has taken to increase its technological competitiveness beyond its own borders.

Analysis

The PRC’s Domestic Approach

Owen Daniels
| September 2023

This report summarizes more than 20 CSET reports, translations, and data analyses to provide insight into China’s internal actions to advance and implement its technology-related policy goals

Analysis

Bolstering U.S. Research Security

Melissa Flagg Zachary Arnold
| September 2020

Establishing a new public-private institution to improve American research security

China’s strategy to grow its science and technology talent includes: 1) improving domestic education; 2) attracting overseas Chinese talent; and 3) attracting foreign talent. While China’s commitment to domestic education reform has achieved remarkable results, significant challenges remain.

Analysis

Maintaining China’s Dependence on Democracies for Advanced Computer Chips

Saif M. Khan Carrick Flynn
| April 2020

China seeks to develop an indigenous semiconductor industry. It is in the strategic interest of the United States and democratic friends for China to remain reliant on them for state-of-the-art computer chips, especially as Beijing invests heavily in advanced chips.

The United States and its allies must develop targeted and coordinated policies to respond to unwanted Chinese technology transfer—gathering more data, raising awareness of tech transfer, and coordinating investment screening procedures as part of a broader agenda of technology alliance cooperation.