China

According to The Hill, China is outpacing the U.S.' development of frontier technologies in part due to China's asymmetric STEM talent. According to a CSET brief, China produces twice as many STEM PhDs annually compared to the U.S.

Research Analyst Emily Weinstein spoke with University World News about continued collaboration between Chinese and American university researchers amidst tensions from the China Initiative.

CSET Research Analyst Dahlia Peterson unpacks China's use of data fusion in its surveillance programs and policy implications.

CSET Legislation Tracker

Daniel Hague Jennifer Melot
| September 2021

The CSET Legislation Tracker serves as a resource to identify and monitor U.S. federal legislation related to emerging technology and national security, with a particular focus on measures relevant to CSET’s key areas of inquiry such as research security, S&T development, and funding for hardware design and manufacturing capabilities. The tracker includes identifying information for each piece of legislation, links to related CSET analyses, and access to associated congressional hearings, among other items.

Robot Hacking Games

Dakota Cary
| September 2021

Software vulnerability discovery, patching, and exploitation—collectively known as the vulnerability lifecycle—is time consuming and labor intensive. Automating the process could significantly improve software security and offensive hacking. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s Cyber Grand Challenge supported teams of researchers from 2014 to 2016 that worked to create these tools. China took notice. In 2017, China hosted its first Robot Hacking Game, seeking to automate the software vulnerability lifecycle. Since then, China has hosted seven such competitions and the People’s Liberation Army has increased its role in hosting the games.

Research Analyst Emily Weinstein spoke with the National Journal about university research and the growing tensions with U.S.-China research collaborations.

AI Education in China and the United States

Dahlia Peterson Kayla Goode Diana Gehlhaus
| September 2021

A globally competitive AI workforce hinges on the education, development, and sustainment of the best and brightest AI talent. This issue brief compares efforts to integrate AI education in China and the United States, and what advantages and disadvantages this entails. The authors consider key differences in system design and oversight, as well as strategic planning. They then explore implications for the U.S. national security community.

Education in China and the United States

Dahlia Peterson Kayla Goode Diana Gehlhaus
| September 2021

A globally competitive AI workforce hinges on the education, development, and sustainment of the best and brightest AI talent. This issue brief provides an overview of the education systems in China and the United States, lending context to better understand the accompanying main report, “AI Education in China and the United States: A Comparative Assessment.”

CSET Research Analyst Jack Corrigan spoke with University World News about China's dedication to tech talent through its STEM PhD growth.

The transfer of national security relevant technology—to peer competitors especially—is a well-documented problem and must be balanced with the benefits of free exchange. The following propositions covering six facets of the transfer issue reflect CSET’s current recommendations on the matter.