Research

CSET produces evidence-driven analysis in a variety of forms, from informative graphics and translations to expert testimony and published reports. Our key areas of inquiry are the foundations of artificial intelligence — such as talent, data and computational power — as well as how AI can be used in cybersecurity and other national security settings. We also do research on the policy tools that can be used to shape AI’s development and use, and on biotechnology.

Report

China’s STI Operations

William Hannas Huey-Meei Chang
| January 2021

Open source intelligence (OSINT) and science and technology intelligence (STI) are realized differently in the United States and China, China putting greater value on both. In the United States’ understanding, OSINT “enables” classified reporting, while in China it is the intelligence of first resort. This contrast extends to STI which has a lower priority in the U.S. system, whereas China and its top leaders personally lavish great attention on STI and rely on it for national decisions. Establishing a “National S&T Analysis Center” within the U.S. government could help to address these challenges.

China


Cybersecurity


Data, algorithms and models


Hardware and compute


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Data Brief

Comparing Corporate and University Publication Activity in AI/ML

Tim Hwang Rebecca Gelles
| January 2021

Based on news coverage alone, it can seem as if corporations dominate the research on artificial intelligence and machine learning when compared to the work of universities and academia. Authors Simon Rodriguez, Tim Hwang and Rebecca Gelles analyze the data over the past decade of research publications and find that, in fact, universities are the more dominant producers of AI papers. They also find that while corporations do tend to generate more citations to the work they publish in the field, these “high performing” papers are most frequently cross-collaborations with university labs.

Analysis

China’s STI Operations

William Hannas Huey-Meei Chang
| January 2021

Open source intelligence (OSINT) and science and technology intelligence (STI) are realized differently in the United States and China, China putting greater value on both. In the United States’ understanding, OSINT “enables” classified reporting, while in China it is the intelligence of first resort. This contrast extends to STI which has a lower priority in the U.S. system, whereas China and its top leaders personally lavish great attention on STI and rely on it for national decisions. Establishing a “National S&T Analysis Center” within the U.S. government could help to address these challenges.

Analysis

Securing Semiconductor Supply Chains

Saif M. Khan
| January 2021

The countries with the greatest capacity to develop, produce and acquire state-of-the-art semiconductor chips hold key advantages in the development of emerging technologies. At present, the United States and its allies possess significant leverage over core segments of the supply chain used to produce these chips. This policy brief outlines actions the United States and its allies can take to secure that advantage in the long term and use it to promote the beneficial use of emerging technologies, such as artificial intelligence.

Analysis

The Semiconductor Supply Chain

Saif M. Khan
| January 2021

Semiconductors are a key component in fueling scientific progress, promoting economic advancement, and ensuring national security. This issue brief summarizes each component of the semiconductor supply chain and where the United States and its allies possess the greatest leverage. A related policy brief, “Securing Semiconductor Supply Chains,” recommends policy actions to ensure the United States maintains this leverage and uses it to promote the beneficial use of emerging technologies, such as artificial intelligence.

See our original translation of a 2016 PRC document that lays out project management guidelines for Chinese Academy of Sciences projects designed to encourage the adaptation of technological breakthroughs for commercial or other practical use.

See our original translation of a 2016 plan from the Chinese Academy of Sciences that aims to encourage its scientists to adapt their discoveries for commercial or other practical uses.

See our original translation of a 2016 PRC document issued by the Chinese Academy of Sciences about its efforts to encourage scientists to find practical applications for their technological innovations.

See our original translation of 2016 PRC regulations that aimed to create clearer and stronger financial incentives for institutions and individuals to convert scientific breakthroughs into commercially viable or otherwise practical applications.

See our original translation of China's law on the "conversion of S&T achievements," originally enacted in 1996 and amended in 2015.