Talent

CSET Research Analyst Emily Weinstein emphasizes how China's Thousand Talent Plan encourages a culture of secrecy among its participants.

Diana Gehlhaus and Ilya Rahkovsky's CSET issue brief "U.S. AI Workforce" shows a lack of evidence to suggest there is an AI talent gap in the United States.

Chinese Students Are Not a Fifth Column

Foreign Affairs
| April 23, 2021

CSET Research Fellows Remco Zwetsloot and Zachary Arnold argue against the banning of Chinese STEM students from the United States and outline how rejecting foreign talent hampers U.S. innovation.

Using research by CSET and the National Security Commission on AI, United States Senators Gary Peters and John Thune introduced the AI Scholarship-for-Service Act to help strengthen the U.S. AI workforce by providing scholarships for students interested in AI.

The National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence is urging Congress to keep foreign talent in the United States. According to a CSET report, "approximately 70%-90% of foreign STEM students in American Ph. D. programs, depending on their STEM field, wish to remain in the United States."

Using survey evidence from CSET in collaboration with various academic institutions, this report assesses the effects of immigration policy on AI talent recruitment.

U.S. AI Workforce

Diana Gehlhaus Ilya Rahkovsky
| April 2021

A lack of good data on the U.S. artificial intelligence workforce limits the potential effectiveness of policies meant to increase and cultivate this cadre of talent. In this issue brief, the authors bridge that information gap with new analysis on the state of the U.S. AI workforce, along with insight into the ongoing concern over AI talent shortages. Their findings suggest some segments of the AI workforce are more likely than others to be experiencing a supply-demand gap.

AI Hubs

Max Langenkamp Melissa Flagg
| April 2021

U.S. policymakers need to understand the landscape of artificial intelligence talent and investment as AI becomes increasingly important to national and economic security. This knowledge is critical as leaders develop new alliances and work to curb China’s growing influence. As an initial effort, an earlier CSET report, “AI Hubs in the United States,” examined the domestic AI ecosystem by mapping where U.S. AI talent is produced, where it is concentrated, and where AI private equity funding goes. Given the global nature of the AI ecosystem and the importance of international talent flows, this paper looks for the centers of AI talent and investment in regions and countries that are key U.S. partners: Europe and the CANZUK countries (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom).

Mapping India’s AI Potential

Husanjot Chahal Sara Abdulla Jonathan Murdick Ilya Rahkovsky
| March 2021

With its massive information technology workforce, thriving research community and a growing technology ecosystem, India has a significant stake in the development of artificial intelligence globally. Drawing from a variety of original CSET datasets, the authors evaluate India’s potential for AI by examining its progress across five categories of indicators pertinent to AI development: talent, research, patents, companies and investments, and compute.

CSET partnered with the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence to discuss the findings and recommendations of the commissions final report, released in early March.